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Family Law Archives

Divorce rates are higher for certain occupations

People in Florida who are actuaries, scientists, physicians or software developers might be less likely to get a divorce than those who work irregular hours. These were among the findings presented by FlowingData based on data from the American Community Survey in 2015. The data also showed that there was a strong correlation between income and divorce rate.

Consistent coparenting after divorce

After Florida parents divorce and their children are moving back and forth between their homes, they may find that their household rules are inconsistent. This can be damaging for children who need stability and consistency at this time. Parents should sit down with a focus on the children to work out how they will make these rules consistent. If children are 6 or older, they may be able to participate in the process as well. These negotiations may go more smoothly if parents decide ahead of time which points they can compromise on and which ones they cannot.

How being in the military may increase divorce risk

According to career website Zippia, first-line enlisted military supervisors have the highest divorce rate by the age of 30. This was determined by analyzing the Census Bureau's Public Use Microdata Sample data. Those in Florida or elsewhere working in this field had a divorce rate of 30 percent by the age of 30. Overall, those working in the military had a 15 percent divorce rate by the age of 30.

Divorce among older Florida couples

The divorce rate among couples over 50 has doubled since 1990, but this is still the age group that is least likely to get a divorce. However, according to a study by the National Center for Family & Marriage Research, there are a few factors that might make some marriages in Florida and throughout the country more vulnerable.

How to best make your case for custody

When it comes to negotiating custody, there are certain things Florida parents can do to present their best case for custody. While the outcome cannot be predicted, it is best to keep in mind that courts will always have the child's best interest at the center of their decisions.

How a parent may request back child support

Florida parents who are asking for child support as part of their divorce order may sometimes want to seek retroactive support from the date that the couple physically separated. If the parent who has not paid support is a father, the custodial parent might have to show proof that he is aware that the child is his. Custodial parents may need to show proof that they have attempted to collect support from the other parent and that the parent has not paid.

How long can late child support be collected?

Florida residents who are divorced and receiving child support might find themselves in a situation where some payments are late and their child is about to turn 18. While in most cases child support orders are terminated by the courts once the child attains majority, there might still be a question about the back-owed support.

Collaborative divorce offers an alternative approach

Divorces in Florida and around the country often become contentious, and even spouses who had hoped to reach a rapid and amicable agreement can be dragged into bitter disputes over matters such as property division and child custody. Unpredictable and costly court battles are generally the outcome when couples become so entrenched in their positions that negotiated settlements become impossible to reach, but alternative approaches including collaborative divorce have become more popular in recent years. 

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